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Why not form a Welcoming Committee?

January 03, 2016
Larlyn Property Management offers advice on how to use a welcoming committee. Share information with new residents and tenants face to face to prevent future conflict and chaos.

“I DIDN’T KNOW THAT.”  

“NO ONE TOLD ME.”

Sound familiar?

It is very common in condo communities that people move in with very little knowledge about their unit and even less about the rules.  Moving is usually a hectic time.  Lots of paperwork is shuffled and set aside to read when there is more time which never seems to materialize.  Even communities with the best of intentions who provide detailed welcome packages find residents not knowing about what to do about garbage, how or when to use facilities, what to expect from the concierge, or what to do about guest parking. Other new residents do not understand how the various card readers or fobs operate or how to open doors. New tenants of condo units generally do not know that problems in their suites should be brought to the attention of their landlord (the unit owner)—not to the manager’s office.

 

This lack of information can create a hectic pace and even chaos in a condo with people running around not knowing what to do or where to go for information. Wouldn’t you agree that receiving information face to face would allow new residents and tenants to remember details far better than if they just receive a stack of paper?  Why not consider a welcoming committee?  A group of long term residents, maybe even board members with the specific purpose of helping new neighbours learn about their community.  This can be a one on one personal conversation or a regularly scheduled orientation session or meet and greet – get creative based on the style of community and personality of the group.  What’s old is new again is a popular theme in the media.  Why not resurrect that old tradition of welcoming new neighbours with a basket of muffins, a friendly face and helping them get to know the lay of the land.  This can go a long way to prevent future conflicts and you might just make a new friend in the process!